Forest Whitaker

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016)

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rogue-1Almost exactly a year ago, the Star Wars saga was triumphantly rejuvenated by the release of Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens, a film that I really enjoyed and was happy to call “almost certainly the best Star Wars film that anyone could possibly have made in 2015,” despite being somewhat frustrated by the sheer metric tonnage of nostalgia and fan service it contained and just how far it was content to ride on the coattails of A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back. The film’s best assets were its new cast and characters which offered an injection of new life and new hope to the franchise, but The Force Awakens itself was too busy revisiting the past and reheating the same themes and plots of the original trilogy to really get the best out of them. Still, it set things up nicely for Episode VIII assuming that the filmmakers can take advantage of what they now have in their arsenal.

Before that film, however, comes a cinematic intermission in the form of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story which clearly positions itself as being a tale from and about the Star Wars universe while not being a part of the main saga itself. Such anthology tales could prove to be the future of the franchise as a whole, with new films headlining Han Solo and Boba Fett already in production, so the importance of Rogue One to the health and wealth of Star Wars can hardly be understated. Read the rest of this entry »

Arrival (2016)

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arrivalThese days, my forays to a multiplex to see a film in its natural habitat are few and far between, and usually limited to a triumvirate of franchises (James Bond, Star Trek and Star Wars) on largely nostalgic grounds. Trips to the cinema outside that are exceptional, and for films I similarly hope to be exceptional in and of themselves. Looking back, my last non-franchise theatrical outing was Ex Machina in January 2015 and it didn’t disappoint. It certainly sets the bar high for Arrival, which opened in cinemas this week and had me duly paying my money at the local Odeon after reading uniformly excellent reviews.

Arrival is the kind of film that simply can’t be described: to try to summarise its storyline would be a truly terrible thing, since it must be seen to be properly experienced. To put it in the simplest and most abstract terms, it’s the story of linguist Dr Louise Banks who is called upon by the military to lead a team trying to establish a dialogue with a mysterious spacecraft that has shown up over Montana, one of 12 such UFOs that have arrived on Earth. Unfortunately no one thought to pack a universal translator and Banks is faced with the impossible task of trying to converse with a lifeform that shares none of our common cultural or language touchstones. As the process drags on, frustrations on both sides build to the point where increasing suspicion and misunderstanding threaten a catastrophic outcome. Read the rest of this entry »