Michael Craze

Doctor Who: The Faceless Ones (1967) [DVD/Blu-ray]

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It’s not been all that long since the end of series 12 of Doctor Who and our last update here on Taking The Short View, yet in that short time it seems like the world has been turned upside down in every conceivable way.

Cinemas were among the first business to have to shut down because of the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, followed soon after by ‘non-essential’ retailers including shops selling both new and used books, CDs and DVDs/Blu-rays. Even television has been hit, with long-running dramas having to shut down production for the duration. Streaming and download services have picked up some of the slack of course, while those of us of a more old-fashioned disposition have rediscovered the value of having extensive home media archives crammed onto groaning shelves around the house.

One new release that did just squeeze under the wire before the general shutdown was the latest addition to the BBC’s Doctor Who home media range, “The Faceless Ones. I’d pre-ordered it weeks before the release date, when coronavirus was completely unknown, and was pleasantly surprised when it turned up on my doorstep just when everything was going to hell in the proverbial handbasket. It’s been a welcome distraction, and the viewing of the episodes strictly rationed to eke out the pleasure of watching a ‘new’ Doctor Who tale for the very first time. Read the rest of this entry »

Doctor Who: The Macra Terror (1967) [DVD/Blu-ray]

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The first part of this year has been good for Doctor Who fans, with no less than four new home media releases in the first three months of 2019. The latest of these hit the shelves on Monday and is a brand-new version of the four-part 1967 serial “The Macra Terror”.

It’s the latest in the BBC’s series of animated reconstructions of ‘lost’ stories, where the original broadcast episodes were wiped by the BBC shortly after transmission and only the soundtrack remains thanks to a fan’s off-air recording at the time. The first of these recovery projects was “The Power of the Daleks” which I reviewed back in 2016 when it originally came out. Since then there’s also been a new version of 1979’s “Shada” in which similar animation was used in place of scenes never actually filmed at the time due to industrial action, meaning that the story was never completed or broadcast. Again, you can catch up with a detailed review of the end result that I wrote a year ago: to be honest, I found the back-and-forth between new line art sequences and the surviving original filmed footage rather jarring.

These are expensive projects and I’d wondered if the sales had been sufficient to justify any more of these reconstructions. But it appears they were, and hence this month Who fans got a brand new release to add to their doubtless already groaning collection of merchandise. However, I confess that I initially wasn’t wildly excited by the prospect of “The Macra Terror”, never having been particularly eager to see the story in question which to me had always sounded rather humdrum in synopsis. Read the rest of this entry »

Doctor Who: The Power of the Daleks (1966) [DVD]

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powerdaleksOf the 97 episodes of 1960s Doctor Who that no longer exist thanks to a cost-saving policy of wiping and reusing master video recordings, perhaps the ones whose loss are most acutely felt by fans of the show are the six comprising “The Power of the Daleks”, Patrick Troughton’s first outing in the role. Not only was it the story that established the act of regeneration in series lore (without which Doctor Who would never have lasted 53 years), it’s also one of the very best stories featuring the Doctor’s arch-nemeses the Daleks. Sadly, although fandom rejoiced when two long-lost stories (“Enemy of the World” and “Web of Fear“) were rediscovered a couple of years back, there’s no hope that any such miraculous resurrection will be possible for “The Power of the Daleks” and so instead we’ve had to make do with a novelisation and an off-air sound recording made by a fan at the time of the story’s single airing on BBC television.

That changed this month with the BBC’s release of a specially commissioned animated reconstruction of the serial. It’s not the first time that the BBC has used animation to cover for a lost episode, but in the past this has been limited to when just one or two episodes of a longer serial are missing (“The Reign of Terror”, “The Tenth Planet”, “The Moonbase”, “The Ice Warriors”, “The Invasion”.) It appeared that the BBC had gone off this idea and the part-completed animation of missing episodes of “The Underwater Menace” was abandoned, while the one still-missing episode of “Web of Fear” was replaced by a series of static stills made up of telesnaps (photographs of a television screen taken during broadcast.)

It’s therefore quite a surprise to see the BBC return to the idea of animation, and moreover for a serial where no episodes at all survive save for a few short clips that had been re-used in other programmes. It’s a mark of how highly regarded the serial is, and how keenly fans of the show have wanted a chance to see it in some form or another. The question is, does it work? Read the rest of this entry »